Old Bengal Bar and New Street Grill
D&D London
Interiors
 
Built in 1771, Old Bengal Warehouse was the first of the British East India Company’s storehouses on the Thames. Stuffed brimful with spice, wine, silk and cigars, Poet Laureate John Masefield once remarked that it held “the wealth of the world and London’s power”.

The Grade II-listed building was bought by D&D London, who enlisted the help of Conran and Partners in renovating it. We designed four unique F+B establishments that pay homage to the Warehouse’s exotic, mercantile past.
 
The interior of the Old Bengal Bar takes its cues from the more stylish of London clubhouses, by way of Brooklyn. The walls are raw brick and the ceiling is dark wood; deep red leather sofas beg to be sunk into. The Old Bengal Bar also features a courtyard garden and outside bar, with blankets provided for the colder months.

New Street Grill, which snakes around the Warehouse’s central courtyard, is a top-end steak restaurant featuring a dark, seductive interior of wood panelled walls and deep red leather. We worked with Hoxton Art Projects to commission artwork for the space.
 
Photography by Paul Raeside
Built in 1771, Old Bengal Warehouse was the first of the British East India Company’s storehouses on the Thames. Stuffed brimful with spice, wine, silk and cigars, Poet Laureate John Masefield once remarked that it held “the wealth of the world and London’s power”.

The Grade II-listed building was bought by D&D London, who enlisted the help of Conran and Partners in renovating it. We designed four unique F+B establishments that pay homage to the Warehouse’s exotic, mercantile past.
 
The interior of the Old Bengal Bar takes its cues from the more stylish of London clubhouses, by way of Brooklyn. The walls are raw brick and the ceiling is dark wood; deep red leather sofas beg to be sunk into. The Old Bengal Bar also features a courtyard garden and outside bar, with blankets provided for the colder months.

New Street Grill, which snakes around the Warehouse’s central courtyard, is a top-end steak restaurant featuring a dark, seductive interior of wood panelled walls and deep red leather. We worked with Hoxton Art Projects to commission artwork for the space.
 
Photography by Paul Raeside
 
speech mark grey
I wanted to evoke a sense of two cultures. The palette of turquoise, fuchsia and copper were chosen to contrast the traditional pose of military figures and capture an imagined sense of history and adventure in an exotic land.
 
Artist Nadine Mahoney on describing her portraits of naval officers
 
 
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